Art at the adega

Aliança underground logoTucked away in the small town of Sangalhos is the Aliança winery. Not such a surprise perhaps, given that Portugal is the 12th largest wine producer on the planet.  But what is surprising is that the Aliança winery is more than just a wine production site and shop.  Hidden, literally underneath the winery is the Aliança Underground museum.  A tour of the museum takes you from Africa to Portugal, via the ageing cellars and back out for a complementary wine tasting at the end.

Sparkling wine ageingA little bit about Aliança first.  Aliança Vinhos de Portugal is the second biggest wine group in Portugal with both wineries and quintas contributing to its range of wines.  Aliança use indigenous grapes from each region, producing DOP wines and IGP wines from the Dão, Douro, Alentejo, Beiras and Bairrada as well as brandies and sparkling wines.

 

 

African artefactsThe museum itself is part of the Berardo Collection, a collection of art put together over many years by José Berardo.   Other collections from the Berardo Collection can be found in Lisbon and at at the BuddhaGarden in Bombarral.

 

 

 

African statuesAt 20 metres underground, the tour starts with a map of the Aliança underground with each ‘station’ on the stop relating to a particular collection or junction in between a collection.  The first stop is Africa where archaeological phallic burial pots and offerings to gods of fertility are displayed alongside weapons, chairs and handcarved goods.  Africa plays  large role in the collection given that Mr Berardo has spent a significant part of his life on that continent.

Photo0321Another stop on the underground tour is the mineral room.  Shaped very much like a mine tunnel and lit appropriately, this is a fine collection of minerals of all shapes and sizes in their raw form.  From quartz to lapiz lazuli, there are minerals from all over the world here including Brazil and Africa. The impressive use of light makes the display even more interesting as the minerals look so different from one angle to the next.  Moving on from the mineral collection is the equally impressive fossil collection which includes fossils from Scotland, England and France.  There’s even a dinosaur jaw there for authenticity.

The Pink Room As the underground tour moves on the wine element increases with the process of barrel ageing of aguardientes and brandies explained and a treat for the eyes in the Pink Room.  The Pink Room is a former ageing cellar for the group’s sparkling wine.

 

 

 

 

A fine collection of minerals

Finally, the tour takes you through the tile rooms, also known as azulejos.  With rescued frescos from Portuguese hotels, churches and pottery by the world famous Bordalo Pinheiro, there is even more to whet your appetite and ready you for the wine tasting at the end.  Aliança’s rose sparkling wine and a low-alcohol summer drink are included on the tasting and can be bought in the shop.  If you simply want to buy wine in the shop, you can pop in at any time.  For a visit to the museum, you need to pre-book by email.  The museum tour is just €3.50 and well worth every cent.  This was my second visit to the museum and I will definitely go again.

A recipe for sweet… or savoury delight

food, tripas, aveiro

Tripas de Aveiro

It seems that the typical Aveirense tongue is a sweet one. Alongside Ovos Moles, there’s the fabulous tripas to tempt the tastebuds.  Tripas in Aveiro are not the same as the ones the people of Porto lap up.  No, they’re quite the opposite.  In Porto tripas are tripe, served in a similar way to the tripe in the UK.  But in Aveiro, they’re a crêpe-like taste sensation, filled with just about any condiment, chocolate brand or sauce you like.

TM&M tripas from Aveiro

M&Ms on a chocolate tripa

Tripas are made of pancake batter, but flattened on a waffle iron before being filled or topped with your choice from the menu – so whether you’re a fan of After Eight chocolate, Lion bars, icecream in a plethora of flavours or something a little more savoury like tuna and cheese, there’s definitely a tripa for you. They’re a great afternoon snack or a light dinner when you’ve eaten too much at lunchtime!

 

To make tripas, just follow this recipe:

  • 3 eggs
  • 250 g of flour
  • 500 ml of cold milk
  • 125 g of sugar
  • 60 g unsalted butter
  • a pinch of salt
  • your chosen topping/filling
  • Mix the eggs and flour together.
  • When the mixture is smooth, slowly add the milk and stir continuously.
  • Add the sugar, melted butter and a pinch of salt.
  • Leave the batter to rest for 30 minutes then grease a waffle iron (or similar) and slowly add the batter in a circular format. Once lightly browned on both sides, add the filling to the centre, then fold into a square shape, as if wrapping a present. Add a topping and serve.  A sprinkle of cinnamon is always a good idea.

 

My favourite place for tripas in Aveiro is on the canal, overlooking the moliceiro boats.  It’s a small place called Tê Zero and you can smell it before you get near the door – yes, it’s that good!

Recipe translated from the Aveiro Lovers website which promotes the best of Aveiro. Their Facebook page has some great links, photos and the latest events in Aveiro.  it’s worth checking it out if you’re in town.

 

Images from Alimentavida17 and Cocò Na Fralda blogs.

The majesty of Alcobaça

Alcobaça is another of Portugal’s hidden gems. A UNESCO World Heritage site, it’s brimming with history. Alcobaça centres around a stunning monastery which can be admired from cafés in the town’s main square or from the old castle, perched about ten minutes walk away.

Acobaça view

A view over Alcobaça

My first visit to Alcobaça coincided nicely with their annual sweet exhibition – the International Conventual Sweet and Liqueur show (Mostra Internacional de Doces e Licores Conventuais). Since 1999 it has taken place every year in November, and has a growing number of international companies taking part.  The show initially focused on cakes, sweets, jams and liqueurs made using traditional processes by nuns and monks. It has grown to include businesses from across Portugal selling sugar infused goodies made the old fashioned way but the nuns are still present with lots of lovely food to try. Top picks include Ovos Moles, Ginja and pão de Ló. Well worth a day’s diversion on any holiday in Portugal, just make sure you take a big shopping bag for the cakes on offer.

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Now that summer is well and truly here in Portugal, the square in front of the monastery is the ideal location to relax in the sun with a slice of cake and  a coffee after exploring the cool interiors of this 12th century Cistercian monastery. Founded in 1153 by the first king of Portugal, Afonso Henriques, it was, along with its church, the first gothic building in Portugal. Containing magnificent carvings, the two most important historic features within it are the tombs of King Pedro I of Portugal and his lover, Ines de Castro, his true love, who was assassinated under orders of his father.  The impressive kitchen includes an awe-inspiring floor to ceiling chimney and the gardens, where the exhibition now takes place, are the perfect place to wander at snail’s pace.

Tickets are €6.00 per person with varying discounts for students, over 65s and families. A combination tickets for monasteries on the Patrimonial Route (three in total are €15 per person). On Sundays and Bank Holidays, entry is free before 2pm.

Dusk

The monastery at dusk